Hoosick Township Historical Society

Buskirk

 

In the 1800s the Great Northern Turnpike extended from Lansingburgh to Rutland, Vermont. It crossed the Hoosick River at Buskirk, then known as Tioshoke, and proceeded north. It is said to have been routed through the West Hoosick area, crossing the river at Tioshoke and on to the old Stage Road. It continued along the Owl Kill Creek on its way to Rutland. The first lasting bridge (uncovered) was built in 1804 by Martin Van Buskirk. The bridge, known as the Buskirk Bridge, gave the community its lasting name. The first bridge was replaced in 1850 with a covered bridge that stands today. The East Buskirk Station and Depot were located on the West Hoosick Road, a short distance from today’s Route 67. It has been renovated into a house in recent years.

There have been three churches built in this community: the Dutch Reformed, Catholic and Methodist churches. The first was the Dutch Reformed Church. It was built in 1792, located at the corner of Route 67 and West Hoosick Road. The Dutch Reformed Church is there today. The Catholic Church is located near the Depot. The Methodist Church, a brick building located north of Route 67 next to the District School building. It was built in 1859 and services were held there until the mid 1950s.

The Methodist Church property was bought from Cornelious and Permellia Lansing in 1843. The deed was signed over to the Buskirk Methodist Episcopal Church. The first building was a wooden structure. The brick building that replaced the original building was built 16 years later in 1859. The church building and property was sold to The Schaghticoke Encampment No 10 Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOF) in 1962. The property is still in their possession.

The District School building was closed about 1958 or ’59 when the district joined the Cambridge Central School System. The Fire Department now owns the school building. They have added a structure for housing their fire trucks and equipment.

The Gold Medal Farms Milk Plant, known as the Creamery, was located next to the covered bridge. It was operated for over 125 years. Milk from local farms was processed into fluid milk for drinking and other milk products. The Creamery building burned on April 8, 19'74.

 

Compiled by Gilbert E Wright